For decades, Dixie has been known as one of Florida’s finest hunting territories for white-tail deer, turkey and wild hog thanks to private hunt clubs which foster wild game on thousands of acres of wilderness, state-managed wildlife areas where wildlife species are encouraged, and federal wildlife refuges which offer high quality hunting on a quota basis.

Dixie Mainline

Posted in Gulf Coast on April 3rd, 2013

The Dixie Mainline Trail parallels the coastline at the northeast edge of the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge. Once a logging access road, much of the trail was inaccessible until the U.S. Wildlife Service recently rebuilt five small bridges across the tidal creeks, opening up areas virtually untouched for a quarter of a century.

Hike, bike or slowly drive (25 mph maximum) this nine-mile trail north from the community of Suwannee. The trail passes through upland pine forest, hardwood hammock, wetlands and tidal creek environments. Expect special nature and wildlife experiences in this undisturbed environment. Watch for herons, egrets, ibis, barred owls, alligator, turtle, small mammals and a variety of plant life.

Along the trail stop at Salt Creek Lookout. Then continue enjoying the old Florida landscape and turn left at paved CR 357. Here you will find the historical Fishbone Cemetery and Fishbone Creek Overlook.The road ends near the Shired Island County Park , which is the perfect place to end the day, watching the sunset on the Gulf.

Brochures are available from the U.S. Wildlife Service with maps of the marked canoe trails and an interpretive guide to the Dixie Mainline.

Originally posted 2012-09-21 22:35:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Suwannee River

Posted in Rivers on April 3rd, 2013

This magnificent river arises in the Okefenokee Swamp straddling the Florida-Georgia border. It’s massive flow is fed by over 197 pristine freshwater springs and unnumbered creeks and tributaries. Lying in Florida’s Big Bend section between the peninsula and the panhandle, it is one of nature’s dividing lines between subtropical southern Florida and the more conventional northerly environments. Managed by the Suwannee River Water Management District, it offers a variety of recreational activities, such as fishing, boating, swimming, hiking, biking, horseback riding, and limited overnight camping. All District-owned tracts are primitive by design and in some cases can only be accessed by foot or boat. The District, in conjunction with the Park Service, has implemented the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, a consortium of public and private entities creating a wonderful paddling experience for everyone. For more information, contact SRWMD, at (800) 226-1066 or (904) 362-1001.

Originally posted 2012-09-21 21:58:11. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Sea Kayak Day Paddles on Florida’s Hidden Coast

Posted in Paddling Trails on April 3rd, 2013


Pure Water Wilderness is proud to offer this FREE download of Sea Kayak Day Paddles on Florida’s Hidden Coast.

Every sea kayaker should have one!16 fantastic paddles along the Gulf Coast from Cedar Key to the Aucilla River.

Accurately mapped and includes GPS waypoints.

Download the book here
A 2.3M PDF File.

 

Download the GPS waypoints here
There are 16 waypoint files,
one for each trip, in a ZIP file.

Free unzipping software is here

If you don’t have it.

Don’t want to print it yourself?

Order for only $12+s&h here

Sample Page Directly From Book

Originally posted 2012-09-21 22:58:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

I Wish I Were In Dixie

Posted in Gulf Coast, Maps, Paddling Trails, Rivers on April 3rd, 2013


For decades, Dixie has been known as one of Florida’s finest hunting territories for white-tail deer, turkey and wild hog thanks to private hunt clubs which foster wild game on thousands of acres of wilderness, state-managed wildlife areas where wildlife species are encouraged, and federal wildlife refuges which offer high quality hunting on a quota basis.

Originally posted 2012-09-19 23:48:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Suwannee

Posted in Gulf Coast on April 3rd, 2013

Secluded at the heart of the beautiful and wild Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge, this unique small community overlooks the river, salt and fresh water creeks and man-made canals. Experience nature at its untouched best while enjoying our waterfront accommodation, great seafood or down-home restaurants, marinas and expert fishing guides.

An unparalleled area of diverse natural environments, the wild and scenic estuary forms a natural blending zone for its marine and freshwater habitats and a division between the temperate and neo-tropical regions of the Gulf coast. The river mouth opens to a scenic vista of tidal marshes dotted with small coastal islands, an area of shallow waters or “flats” and oyster bars teaming with fish. Natural salt marches and tidal flats attract thousands of shorebirds while acting as a nursery for fish, shrimp and shellfish.

One of the largest undeveloped delta-estuarine systems in the United States, the area is protected by the 52,935-acre Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge. The refuge was established in 1979 and covers both sides of the Suwannee River upriver for almost fifteen miles and 26 miles of Gulf habitat. The overall goal of the refuge is to provide optimum conditions to manage and protect the natural heritage of the area, while giving as much public access as possible.

Originally posted 2012-09-21 22:37:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter