Dixie County is located between Tampa and Tallahassee on U.S. 19. The Gulf of Mexico, Dixie’s western border, provides a natural sanctuary for the harvesting of seafood. Dixie’s eastern, southern, and northern borders are the Suwannee and Steinhatchee Rivers which offer excellent water activities and empty into the Gulf of Mexico at quaint fishing villages.

Barnett Creek to McCormick Creek Paddle

Posted in Gulf Coast, Maps, Paddling Trails on April 3rd, 2013

High resolution, downloadable pdf versions are available by clicking on the image. The pdf versions are can be enlarged, using the zoom feature, to make details easier to read.

Originally posted 2012-09-24 11:19:27. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

I Wish I Were In Dixie

Posted in Gulf Coast, Maps, Paddling Trails, Rivers on April 3rd, 2013


Dixie County is located between Tampa and Tallahassee on U.S. 19. The Gulf of Mexico, Dixie’s western border, provides a natural sanctuary for the harvesting of seafood. Dixie’s eastern, southern, and northern borders are the Suwannee and Steinhatchee Rivers which offer excellent water activities and empty into the Gulf of Mexico at quaint fishing villages.

Originally posted 2012-09-19 23:48:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Sandfly Creek Paddle

Posted in Maps, Paddling Trails, Suwannee on April 3rd, 2013

High resolution, downloadable pdf versions are available by clicking on the image. The pdf versions are can be enlarged, using the zoom feature, to make details easier to read.

Originally posted 2012-09-24 10:56:11. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Horseshoe Beach

Posted in Gulf Coast on April 3rd, 2013

Horseshoe Beach is an isolated, laid back, friendly fishing village located on the Gulf of Mexico west of Gainesville. Our city limits sign reads – Welcome to “Florida’s Last Frontier”. We are 20 miles to the closest major highway.

The Horseshoe Beach area was settled in the early 1800s. The land was owned by lumber interests until 1935, when C.C. Douglas and Burton Butler purchased the land for $324, since the lumber company was pressuring the residents to “move on”. The Butler/Douglas union made it possible for the settlers to own their occupied property. They offered each resident the lot he was living on for $10. The town was incorporated in 1963. The town now has a restaurant, full-service marina, ice cream shop, two churches, a number of comfortable rental cabins, a waterfront park, and a general store.

Originally posted 2012-09-21 22:47:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Suwannee River

Posted in Rivers on April 3rd, 2013

This magnificent river arises in the Okefenokee Swamp straddling the Florida-Georgia border. It’s massive flow is fed by over 197 pristine freshwater springs and unnumbered creeks and tributaries. Lying in Florida’s Big Bend section between the peninsula and the panhandle, it is one of nature’s dividing lines between subtropical southern Florida and the more conventional northerly environments. Managed by the Suwannee River Water Management District, it offers a variety of recreational activities, such as fishing, boating, swimming, hiking, biking, horseback riding, and limited overnight camping. All District-owned tracts are primitive by design and in some cases can only be accessed by foot or boat. The District, in conjunction with the Park Service, has implemented the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, a consortium of public and private entities creating a wonderful paddling experience for everyone. For more information, contact SRWMD, at (800) 226-1066 or (904) 362-1001.

Originally posted 2012-09-21 21:58:11. Republished by Blog Post Promoter